Lime

Tests for Strength of Lime Mortars

Tests for Strength of Lime Mortars Two bricks are joined flat in a cross fashion one over the other with 12 mm mortar joint. Bricks are thoroughly soaked in water before joining and cured for 7 days after they are jointed. Load required to separate them at joint gives the adhesiv...

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Lime Mortars

Lime Mortars Lime mortars require grinding to slake the unslaked particles and to make an intimate mixture of the materials. Lime/surkhi mortars are ground in two operations, first only the lime and surkhi are ground together and then sand is added and again ground. For big jobs ...

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Shell Lime

Shell Lime Shell lime freshly slaked is used for polished plaster and white washing. It comes under the catagory of ‘fat limes’. ...

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Poor Lime (or) Lean Lime

Poor Lime (or) Lean Lime Poor lime also called Meagre or Lean lime, contains from 10 to 40 per cent impurities insoluble in acids such as sand and stones, takes longer to slake, does not increase in bulk, to such an extent (less than twice) as pure lime and has inferior plasticit...

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Burning of Lime

Burning of Lime Limestone is burnt in clamps or kilns. Fuel used is generally, coal-dust or fire-wood. Cowdung or litter should not be used with kankar. A clamp consists of a heap of limestone and coal stacked in alternate layers and is used for burning only small quantities of l...

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Setting and Suitability of Limes

Setting and Suitability of Limes In the case of pure lime, the setting takes place partly by the absorption of carbon dioxide from the air and partly by drying which is facilitated by dry conditions; and the setting action is very slow. Slaked fat lime has a great tendency to abs...

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Methods of Slaking Lime

Methods of Slaking Lime Platform slaking. Lime is spread over a dry nonporous platform in a 15 to 23 cm layer and water poured over it generously through a nozzle, and heaps turned over and over between each application of water until the lime disintegrates to a fine powder. Tank...

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Hydraulic Lime

Hydraulic Lime Hydraulic lime is obtained by burning kankar or clayey limestones. Lime is considered to be hydraulic when it sets under water within 7 to 30 days. Lime is called feebly hydraulic, moderately hydraulic or eminently hydraulic according to its readiness to set under ...

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Fat Lime (or) White Lime

Fat Lime (or) White Lime Fat lime which is also called stone-lime or white lime is high calcium lime with about 6 per cent material insoluble in acid, chiefly obtained by burning (called calcination) in a kiln pure limestone, chalk or sea shells, etc. (calcium carbonate). By burn...

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